Japanese cuisine is easily one of the most complex, rooted, and scientific cuisines in the world. To be a Japanese chef who practices Japanese cuisine is to have gastronomic knowledge above par. It goes way beyond just sushi and ramen and demands patience along with a very adaptable palate to try the other truly authentic Japanese dishes that the country has to offer. After all, Tokyo has more Michelin restaurants than anywhere else in the world. In fact, it is said that it is difficult to get a bad meal when you’re in Japan because even the smallest of restaurants will serve what Japanese restaurants anywhere in the world can’t. By Shubhanjana Das

1. Yamano, Akihabara

Photo credit: Lamhub
Japanese style barbeque. Image credit – Lamhub (Shutterstock).

Yamono in Akihabara is a contrast of the bustling streets as the restaurant offers that quintessential calmness and intimacy that Japanese eateries have always known to be. Renowned amongst locals for the authentic Japanese-style barbeque, or yakiniku, as they call it, their A-5 rank Japanese beef cooked on an open fire would be a hard find elsewhere.

2. Itamae Sushi, Asakusa

It is only in Japan that you get to witness that fish-cutting and sushi-making is treated as an art form, almost a performance by the chefs before they serve their preparation. At Itamae Sushi, only the finest quality tuna is used for their sushis, which is cut by the sushi maestros behind the bar kitchen seating to allow an unobstructed view.

3. Kozue, Shinjuku City

Why stop at a palatable treat when you can indulge all your senses at Kozue by booking a table that commands a majestic view of Mt. Fuji. The three time Michelin star winning restaurant, hosts guests in a contemporary rendition of the traditional Kaiseki, which is an old Japanese style of dining where guests are served a certain number of dishes individually on a tray. Pufferfish, matsutake mushrooms and shabu-shabu beef are only a few things from their extremely well-curated menu, which is served by hospitable waiters in kimonos.

4. Yabu Soba, Taito City

Have you really had the best of Japanese cuisine if you haven’t tried their Soba noodles? A staple in Japanese culinary practice, Soba noodles are made from buckwheat flour and in Yabu Soba, the tradition of making soba noodles has been going on since 1892 when the restaurant was founded. Don’t confuse the ramen with the soba though, because unlike ramen, soba noodles are served separately from the broth with a side of meat, veggies or, even better, tempura, which makes it the one of the most fulfilling and wholesome culinary experiences you will have.

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