Starting October 1, you will be able to use your cell phone while driving, as per this new amendment in the current Motor Vehicles Act; but only for navigation. By Kumar Shree

The Ministry of Road Transport and Highways has recently made some changes in the current Motor Vehicles Act, according to which, starting October 1, drivers can use mobile phones while driving, but only for navigation, and nothing else. Moreover, the device should not disturb the concentration of the driver, and the old rule that attracts a fine of anywhere between INR 1,000 to INR 5,000 must continue to prevail.

 

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The ministry says that the rules have been amended in order to facilitate better maintenance of important vehicle documents. These documents include licence, registration documents, fitness certificates and permits.

A web portal set up and maintained by the government will keep a bank of these documents. It will also maintain a record of offences such as compounding, impounding, making endorsements, suspension and revocation of licences and registrations, and e-challans.

As reported by Live Mint, an official statement said, “Use of IT services and electronic monitoring will result in better enforcement of traffic rules in the country and will lead to removing harassment of drivers.”

Since the portal will chronologically enlist all records related to revocation or disqualification of the driving licence, it will be easier for authorities to monitor the behaviour of any driver. The portal will also have all the history of any seized documents.

 

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The official statement as reported by the media further suggested that this system will also help record the date, time and identity of any policeman or any other officer while demanding or inspecting any documents. This, in turn, will put a stop on incidents of unnecessary checking, inspection and harassment of drivers.

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