From Parsi food in Mumbai, to the Taj Mahal in Agra, Freida Pinto is curating the most scenic trip for her significant other. By Gayatri Moodliar

Freida Pinto is here in India playing tour guide to her boyfriend Cory Tran, a photographer and self-proclaimed adrenaline-junkie, and the pictures are nothing short of ethereal.

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Just love 💛

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Covering all the usual hot-spots, she did make sure to include a visit to the iconic Parsi restaurant Britannia & Co. (her recommendation, in case you were wondering, is the berry pulao and sali boti, a delectable mutton-based dish). It was a nostalgia-fuelled trip as it was where she would go during her college years.

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As a Bombay Girl at heart, it is impossible to not feel nostalgic in some of this city's oldest and still popular charms. Like Britannia & Co.. I used to frequent this Parsi restaurant as a student of St. Xavier's College and religiously ordered the Berry Pulav and sali boti. But it is not just the delish food you take in here, you are literally breathing in so much history and culture. The restaurant's 94yr old owner Boman Kohinoor personally comes over to take your order and share his stories. . . The Parsi community fled to India some 1200 years ago to escape persecution during the Arab conquest of Persia. Seeking refuge in India, they blend their own culture and traditions with the Hindu culture and created a new identity for themselves, while still retaining their roots.There is so much you will be curious about at this vintage, quaint little establishment started in 1923, but above all, you will find impossible to ignore that migration does create so much flavour and richness. Immigrants DO NOT change culture they EXPAND culture by expanding your world view and making it so much more connected. . . Follow @coryt to see some beautiful pictures he captured at this historic must visit spot in Mumbai. Jai Ho!

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Next up in their triangle were the India Gate and The Red Fort.

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Red Fort / Lal Qila- This magnifcent red sanstone fortress was the home to the Mughal Emperors for 200 years. It was built by the fifth Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in the mid 17th century as their ceremonial and political headquarters.There were so many sections to this fort complex- the queen's quarters, the harem apartments, servants' quarters, hammam, the sprawling gardens… This fort was also looted and ravaged by war multiple times during the various invasions and take-overs ( Nadir Shah, the Marathas, British Raj). The peacock throne, the Koh-i-noor diamond, the jade cup for example were some of the things that were removed from it's home. A lot of historians have documented in detail what the Red Fort has seen and experienced but I stop for a second here in stillness and wonder what are the stories that they might have missed? Stories that have feelings and emotions. If only these red sandstone pillars could speak…. . . Photo cred 📷 : @coryt . . This handwoven kurta and scarf by the incredi ble @anitadongre

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Red Fort. Old Delhi, India.

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The last point was, of course, the Taj Mahal.

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QUEEN

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Taj Mahal 💛

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Cory Tran is an acclaimed adventure photographer, based out of Los Angeles, and his pictures will make you want to explore all the picturesque locations he visits.

Related: Dalmia Bharat Group Adopts Red Fort; Taj Mahal Up Next