Protecting the environment and fighting climate change by adopting sustainable practices has never been more important than now! A new study has reported that Arctic summers could be ice-free before 2050; even after extensively cutting the current carbon emissions. By Manya Saini

The ice in the Arctic grows and shrinks throughout the year, however, it is always present. The habitat that is home to animals like the polar bear has seen rapid climate change. A team of researchers have found that even if present emission-cut goals are met and carbon dioxide outflow is regulated as per the Paris Agreement it still might not be sufficient.

 

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The study was published in the Geophysical Research Letters, led by the University of Hamburg in collaboration with 21 research institutions. The researchers studied over 40 different climate models to conclude that preservation should focus on a drastic reduction of greenhouse gases.

As per reports, Climate Scientist Dirk Notz, from the University of Hamburg has reiterated that the results surprised the team themselves. He added that even if the rate of global warming is kept near the pre-industrial levels, the Arctic ice is likely to occasionally melt in summers before 2050.

 

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The melting of the ice has a multitude of dangers ranging from the rise in sea level to the loss of hunting grounds and natural habitat of seals and polar bears. It will also impact global weather and can adversely affect patterns across the world.

Satellite images of the Arctic have been available since 1979, they show a loss of 40 per cent ice in terms of area and 70 per cent in terms of volume till 2019. It is cited as one of the most prominent signs of global warming. The devastating effects and its subsequent impact can be controlled if people across the world rally and work together to reduce their carbon footprint.

Related: #DreamEscapes: Discovering An Entirely New World Above The Arctic Circle